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20121129
20121207
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)
wants to avoid with this fiscal cliff conversation. that's why a deal is going to be hammered out probably before the end of the year. the president does have a little political head wind. >> this gives, i think, labor a real opportunity to show the country the graph that we showed, the separation between corporate profits are right there at a record level and wages are going down. the republicans have been so strong to even want to take away workers voices in the workplace. but in these fiscal cliff negotiations, do you really think that the republicans see this chart and they need that economy to slow down a little bit if they are going to win this? >> maybe so. the income inequality in this country has been a problem but it has been for decades. it's been exacerbated by policies passed more recently. so when you go into negotiations, you ask, is it politically correct to be out there arguing that the 2% need to have their tax cuts protected? that's the problem that republicans face. labor does have a bit of an upper hand on this one. but then again, you look at all the stuff be
that republicans have to deal with as they think about the politics and the optics of how the fiscal cliff gets resolved. in the end, they have got not much. they can say they have a mandate so it's equal, but it really isn't and they know that. >> we seem to know as much about mitt romney's taxes as we do about the loopholes republicans are willing to close in this. they can't offer any specifics. is this a turnoff for the people? >> in fairness we have to recognize that there's been a lack of specifics on both sides here. they are negotiating in public. you notice that that's how this stuff is coming out. it's not phone calls between the two sides or closed-door meetings. we don't know what spending democrats would cut and we haven't even begun the entitlements discussion, which the president is theoretically open to. so there's a lot that still needs to happen. i mean for you and me and normal people, three weeks away may seem like a short time, but there's a feeling that this has barely even begun. >> here's senator bob corker and claire mccaskill. here it is. >> i have just laid out in ver
for 24 hours with prevacid24hr. >>> welcome back. the fight over the fiscal cliff heating up with both parties accusing the other of failing to offer substantial plans. >> to this point, that's right. without a deal, automatic spending cuts and higher taxes will kick in january 1st. that's something our next guest wants to avoid. we welcome back democratic congressman charlie rangel of new york. good to see you. welcome back. >> good to be back. >> we're at that awkward part of the negotiating process where nobody wants to be the first to step up, especially on the spending side. so do you want to be that person? can you give us some sense of where the democratic side would want to make those cuts in entitlements to get us closer to a deal? >> how in the world would you talk about cutting spending before you find out how much you have to spend? isn't this all about a revenue shortfall? the first thing we should do is find out, how much money can reraise, what is the gap, and what we can't do in terms of raising revenue we go to the cuts part. >> that's a great point. so let's do that.
, now i'm as concerned as anybody else about the fiscal cliff. but thinking -- you know that the new congress that is coming in has less of the crazy tea baggers than the ones that we're dealing with now. as my understanding that congress can write legislation that's retro active to the first of the year. it may not be such a bad thing going over it afterall. >> stephanie: gayle, i swear to god i understand people -- even the white house saying that would not be preferrable to do that and that markets may react. i'm starting to agree with you. the more i see mcconnell and boehner's comments and how unseriously they're treating this, the lack of specificity of what their plan is, that's what i think. go over the bunny hill or whatever the hell it is. whatever this thing is. the slopy thing. >> the ramp. the hump. >> stephanie: bush tax cuts are gone for the rich. they're gone. they're done. you fix it retroactively with a new congress. it is not like -- it really is like a cliff. maybe a couple of weeks,
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)